Florida Snook The Seasonal Treat

Florida Snook The Seasonal Treat

Back to: >>Florida Fishing

Snook are strictly regulated to protect it from overfishing. Catching them requires a license, permit, they must be within range of a certain size, the bag limit is one a day, you’re only allowed to keep them in season and they are not allowed to be sold or bought. So your only way of having some is to grab your gear and get out on the water.

Many say its all worth it for an amazing seasonal treat. Snook is a delicious sport fish, ask almost anyone that has tried a bite. They will normally reply that it was one of the best tasting fish that they have ever had. The meat is white, with medium density and a mild subtle taste.With countless recipes online a quick search will bring up a plethora of options to choose. remember to remove the skin or your gonna have a bad time. Anyways a favorite among many is the deep fried fish method. But which every way you like to prepare them this is definitely a tasty fish unless you don’t take the skin off then its not.

Snook can be found in south and central Florida mostly inshore brackish and coastal waters. they can also be found along man made structures mangroves, and shorelines and Large schools form in summer for spawning.

Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report

Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report

“Fishing has improved along Florida’s Space Coast. During the past few days, calm conditions and warmer temperatures have allowed anglers several opportunities to catch some nice fish throughout our region. To begin with, several nice speckled trout have been caught in both the Indian and Banana Rivers. Live shrimp or small scented jerk baits rigged under a popping cork has worked well during the mid-morning hours. When targeting trout, anglers can expect these fish to feed near sandy potholes in 2-4 feet of water. Anglers should keep in mind trout can be easily spooked at times. Making long casts while drifting can help increase your chances of catching a nice fish,” reports Capt. Keith Mixon of Mixin’ Work With Play Fishing Charters for this Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report.

“A few slot size redfish have also been caught in the northern end of the Indian River. Sight casting to them has worked best during calm conditions. Live shrimp or Bass Assassin’s four inch Saltwater Assassin’s Shrimp Cocktail in Houdini or Drunk Monkey color has worked well when rigged weedless. The key to hooking up with one of these redfish is to fish the bait as slowly as possible,” Mixon reports.

“At the port, a few tripletail have been caught along the Canaveral buoy line as well as floating structure. A free lined shrimp has been the bait of choice for these hard fighting fish. Sight casting is the best way to catch them when conditions are calm during mid-day. Some of these fish have measured up to 22 inches in length,” Mixon reports.

Our Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report allows you access to understand how the fish are moving and where you can catch Redfish. The Cape Canaveral Area is one of the best Redfish destinations in Florida. Inshore Fishing dominates and this is the perfect reason why. These river systems that make up the Lagoon provide ample fishing territory to enjoy an amazing fishing trip. Bring along your friends or families for an adventure of a lifetime on an New Smyrna Beach Fishing Charters.

Your Adventure Starts Today while Visiting Florida.

If you enjoyed this post about New Smyrna Beach Fishing, you might also enjoy our Fishing reports.

Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookPinterestTwitter and Instagram.

Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report

Mosquito Lagoon Red Fishing

_______________________________________________________

‘This is a big fish! This is a big fish! This is a big fish!” It was all Jim from Delaware could yell as his drag smoked and rod arched over underneath the power of a giant redfish screaming across the shallow grass flats.

Jim along with his new fishing buddy Al Iodice of New Hampshire had already fought and boated over a dozen big redfish on the spectacular morning of fishing in the Mosquito Lagoon near Titusville, Florida, most weighing between 10 and 15 pounds. However, the beast now being battled was an all-together different class of ‘big’.

Before the sudden chaos could completely grip the situation, Capt. Rocky quickly released the hydraulic Power Pole, grabbed his graphic push pole, manned the poling platform and began chasing down the big red beast.

Thirty minutes later, after thirty more shouts by Jim and thirty laps spun around the flats boat by Al with landing net in hand and thirty minutes of hard pushing by the captain while interspersing  blurbs of instructions and bursts laughter, the 30 pound, big bronzed beauty was finally aboard.

Afterwards, with arms aching, an adrenalin-drained Jim could be heard muttering, “That was a big fish.” (Pictured below are Jim and Al smiling broadly with one really ‘big fish’.)

Capt Rocky

Your Adventure Starts Today while Visiting Florida.

If you enjoyed this post about New Smyrna Beach Fishing, you might also enjoy our Fishing reports.

Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookPinterestTwitter and Instagram.

 

Snook Migratory Habits

Snook Migratory Habits

Snook Migratory Habits

Snook are fish that live either in saltwater or fresh water. Tricky to catch, Snook are still much sought-after because of their delicious meat and the challenge of catching one. Like most fish, Snook are cold blooded animals. Thus, they rely on the water temperature to regulate the temperature of their bodies. Cold temperatures are detrimental to the health of this fish species and sudden drops in temperature can be deadly. Thus, Snook have to migrate to warmer waters such as Flamingo in the Florida Keys when winter begins.

The migration patterns largely depend on where they are currently located, what temperature that location has, and in what direction is the warmer body of water. Snook migrating through the waters of Florida follow an east to west pattern, as opposed to the usual north to south that many fish species do.

Snook can easily move from freshwater to salt water and vice versa. Those who have observed them swim upstream say that they stay close to the center of the water body – be it a large river or a small creek. Also, Snook love to travel during day time.

The problem with migrating Snook is that they ignore your bait, most of the time, no matter how delicious it might be. They are also easily spooked so fly fishing for Snook can be frustrating. In fact, Snook are the most difficult to catch when they are migrating. Still, if you try to be as subtle as you can, you’d probably be able to entice one to take your bait.

Snook Fishing in Florida:

Snook Fishing in Florida in the ultimate inshore fishing experience. You truly can’t beat the action especially once the snook move in during their migrations. Most of the migrations are due to mating and that search for warmer weather. Summer months are the most productive months to catch them but also the time of year that you can’t harvest them. According to FWC, Dec. 15- Jan. 31st and June 1st- Aug. 31st seasons of harvest are closed.

September 1st brings about one of the most incredible times to go Night Fishing in New Smyrna. Inshore Fishing for these elusive beasts will be one of the most action packed fishing adventures of your lifetime!

Your Adventure Starts Today while Visiting Florida.

If you enjoyed this post about New Smyrna Beach Fishing, you might also enjoy our Fishing reports.

Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookPinterestTwitter and Instagram.

WhatsApp chat